Buffalo Announcements


  1. WISDM at the Buffalo Pink Street Party

    The Pink Street Party is a unique event hosted by Buffalo Hospital Foundation to honor those who have experienced cancer, elevate cancer awareness, and enhance Cancer Care Services in our community. Every dollar raised stays in our community. Patty Erickson, WISDM CommPinkStreetParty2013unity Outreach Coordinator and Darlene Steenholdt, WISDM nurse, were available for questions and offered educational materials about colorectal cancer screening.

     

     

  2. Over 50? Time to learn your colorectal cancer screening options

     

    BUFFALO, Minn. (July30, 2013)— The US Preventive Services Task Force and the American Cancer Society recommend that starting at age 50 average-risk men and women should have regular screening for colorectal cancer.  Unfortunately, many people delay making this important decision despite the fact that screening can save lives. As many as 3 out of 10 Buffalo residents, 50-75 years of age are not screened for colorectal cancer per current guidelines.

     

    If you’re like many people, medical decisions can be confusing.  Finding the right information can be difficult. It is important for people to know their screening options, understand the advantages and disadvantages (pros and cons) of each screening test, be empowered to ask questions, and tell their healthcare provider about what might be holding them back from making this important decision.

     

    Buffalo Community Outreach Coordinator, Patty Erickson, couldn’t agree more. In fact, she joined the CRCS-WISDM project to encourage the people of Buffalo to learn more about the benefits of screening:

     

    “In recently turning 50, I am personally more aware of the importance of screening and committed to making a screening decision. In preparing for this important decision, I’ve found the www.ScreenToPrevent.com website to be very valuable to weigh my options in accordance with my personal values. I am now ready to discuss and decide with my physician the best option for me.”

     

    Screenings can find polyps so they can be removed before they turn into cancer. Screenings can also prevent and identify cancer early in people without symptoms, when the chance of cure is high. Bottom line: colorectal cancer screening can save your life!

     

    For more information about colorectal cancer screening, screening options, and local resources, or to download a booklet with information to help you or important people in your life make a colorectal cancer screening decision, visit the CRCS-WISDM web site: www.ScreenToPrevent.com. The site also features tips on how to talk about this topic with your doctor and other important people in your life.

     

    Talking about colorectal cancer screening isn’t always easy. If you have additional questions, want to learn more about screening tests, or would like to talk about your screening options with a registered nurse, please dial the Colorectal Cancer Screening community call-in line at (763) 684-7129.

     

    About CRCS-WISDM

    The CRCS-WISDM Project is a joint initiative of Allina Medical Clinic – Buffalo, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Minnesota, Virginia Commonwealth University and the Buffalo community.

     

    About Allina Medical Clinic and Allina Health 

    Allina Medical Clinic offers primary and specialty care services at 42 locations in 32 communities in Minnesota and western Wisconsin. Part of Allina Health, Allina Medical Clinic providers believe strong connections are at the heart of quality health care and they work hard to build relationships and trust with their patients.          

     

    Allina Health is dedicated to the prevention and treatment of illness and enhancing the greater health of individuals, families and communities throughout Minnesota and western Wisconsin. A not-for-profit health care system, Allina Health cares for patients from beginning to end-of-life through its 90+ clinics, 11 hospitals, 15 pharmacies, specialty care centers and specialty medical services that provide hospice care, oxygen and home medical equipment, and emergency medical transportation services. Learn more at allinahealth.org.

  3. 2013 Buffalo Parade

    June 15, 2013

    WISDM team walked in the Buffalo Parade to promote colorectal cancer screening options and get the word out.

    WISDM_Buffalo Parade_06-15-13

  4. Buffalo Relay for Life July 19-20

    Posted on April 6, 2013

     Relay for Life_April 2013Kick-Off Event

     

     

     

     

     

    Click here to join the “Don’t Fear the Rear” team at the Buffalo Relay for Life event on July 19-20, 2013.

  5. Buffalo proclaims Colorectal Cancer Screening Awareness Month

    City Council makes proclamation at health fair on March 23

     Colorectal Cancer Screening Awareness Month Proclamation 3-23-13DSC00693

    BUFFALO, Minn. (March 19, 2013) — The Buffalo City Council proclaimed March as Colorectal Cancer Screening Awareness Month in the city. On behalf of the City Council, Scott Enter read the proclamation at the annual Buffalo Community Health Fair on March 23.

     

    The proclamation reads:

    WHEREAS colorectal cancer is the second most common cause of cancer deaths for men and women in the United States, but it doesn’t have to be;

     

    WHEREAS colorectal cancer is highly treatable if found early, and often preventable altogether through screening;

     

    WHEREAS anyone can get colorectal cancer, even if they have no family or personal history;

     

    WHEREAS colorectal cancer most often starts without any signs or symptoms, so that even when you feel healthy, screening is an essential part of staying healthy;

     

    WHEREAS multiple colorectal cancer screening options are available in our community;

     

    WHEREAS while making a decision about colorectal cancer screening, everyone should know their options, learn the facts, and understand the pros and cons of each screening option;

     

    WHEREAS everyone 50 years of age and older should feel empowered to ask their doctor about colorectal cancer screening;

     

    WHEREAS talking about colorectal cancer screening is important, even if it’s not always a comfortable topic of conversation;

     

    WHEREAS everyone in Hastings/Buffalo should be empowered to make personalized, informed medical decisions about colorectal cancer screening that are consistent with their own personal values, preferences, and best available medical information, with support from important people in their life; and

     

    WHEREAS observing Colorectal Cancer Screening Awareness Month during the month of March would provide a special opportunity to offer education on the importance of early detection and screening.

     

    NOW THEREFORE, we do hereby proclaim March 2013 as: COLORECTAL CANCER SCREENING AWARENESS MONTH.

     

     

    March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month and the CRCS- WISDM Project (Colorectal Cancer Screening With Improved Shared Decision Making) urges everyone to start talking about it.

     

    Talking about colorectal cancer screening isn’t always easy. If you have additional questions, want to learn more about screening tests, or would like to talk about your screening options, please dial the Colorectal Cancer Screening community call-in line at (651) 438-1699 to talk to a registered nurse.

     

    For more information about colorectal cancer screening, screening options, and local resources; or to download a booklet with information to help you or a loved one make a colorectal cancer screening decision, visit the CRCS-WISDM web site: www.ScreenToPrevent.com/.

  6. March is National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month: You can make a difference by talking about it

    Second-leading cancer killer in the U.S. is preventable

     

     

    BUFFALO, Minn. (March 4, 2013) — March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month and the CRCS- WISDM Project (Colorectal Cancer Screening With Improved Shared Decision Making) urges everyone to start talking about it.

     

    “A routine screening colonoscopy probably saved my own life after I turned 50 even without having any personal risk factors,” says Andrew Burgdorf, MD, Allina Medical Clinic Buffalo. “Colorectal cancer is among the most preventable of all cancers, but screening is vital to prevention. Both men and women should start getting screened at 50 years of age or earlier if any risk factors. Unfortunately, as many as three out of ten Buffalo residents between 50 and 75 years of age have not been screened adequately.”

     

    To start a conversation with important people in your life, here are some important things everyone should know about colorectal cancer screening:

     

    Colorectal cancer is the 2nd-leading cancer killer in the U.S., but it doesn’t have to be!

    • §  Colorectal cancer starts without any signs or symptoms
    • §  Anyone can get colorectal cancer, even if they have no family or personal history
    • §  Colorectal cancer is just as common in women as men

     

    Colorectal cancer is often preventable through screening. Screening can save your life!

    • §  Everyone over 50 years of age should ask their doctor about colorectal cancer screening
    • §  Even when you feel healthy, colorectal cancer screening is an essential part of staying healthy

     

    You have colorectal cancer screening options:

    • §  The fecal occult blood test (FOBT) is a home stool test you can get at your doctor’s office; generally recommended every year
    • §  Colonoscopy is a test done in a medical facility by a doctor who specializes in the procedure; generally recommended every 10 years
    • §  You can always choose not to get screened

     

    You don’t have to make a screening decision alone. Talk to your healthcare provider and with other important people in your life. Their experience matters, and so does yours.

     

    Colorectal cancer screening is covered by most insurance plans and Medicare.

     

    Talking about colorectal cancer screening isn’t always easy. If you have additional questions, want to learn more about screening tests, or would like to talk about your screening options, please dial the Colorectal Cancer Screening community call-in line at (763) 684-7129 to talk to a registered nurse.

     

    “We want Buffalo community members to be informed and feel comfortable talking to their family doctor about colorectal cancer so they can make the right choices for themselves and their family,” Burgdorf says. “Colorectal cancer can be deadly, but it’s so easy to prevent. We owe it to ourselves and our families to make the effort to be screened for colorectal cancer.”

     

    For more information about colorectal cancer screening, screening options, and local resources; or to download a booklet with information to help you or a loved one make a colorectal cancer screening decision, visit the CRCS-WISDM web site: www.ScreenToPrevent.com/.